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State takes full control over education

If ever there was a year when parents and children lost freedom in education, it was 2014. Public schools lost the freedom to choose textbooks, pupils lost freedom to choose subjects, compulsory school attendance is extended,  the administrative burden of private schools increases and National Curriculum is extended to birth. All these changes were announced by the Minister of Basic Education, without anyone making much of a fuss.

Public schools lose choice of textbooks

In 2012 Tuisskolers.org pointed out that the centralization of purchasing textbooks will reduce the freedom of schools to choose appropriate textbooks. Schools can no longer choose which books they want to buy, but are only able to choose from a catalogue drafted by the National Department of Education. In the meantime this has been implemented. Schools have a choice of about eight different books per subject. 

In her 2014 budget speech , the Minister of Education announced that this choice will now be taken away, since only one book per subject will be available. This implies that the state is now in full control of all content that children learn in public schools. Parents and schools have no say about it. This is the end result of the process that Prof. Kader Asmal started in 2002 with the promulgation of a National Curriculum Framework.

Pupils lose more subject choices

Another thing that is  currently being considered ; is to make the subject of history compulsory. This implies that all learners are compelled to learn the state's interpretation of history from a single state prescribed textbook. 

At present pupils who follow the national curriculum follow seven (7) subjects. Four (4) are mandatory (2 languages, Mathematics / Mathematical Literacy, Life Orientation) and three (3) subjects are electives. Pupils therefore have the freedom to choose 42% of their subjects. In the event that history is also made compulsory, their freedom will be reduced to 28%. 

The fact that this compulsory subject will be history also indicates where the priorities of the state lie. While neither business leaders nor economists have ever complained about a shortage of skills in the field of history, it is this subject that is being made compulsory. The purpose of this step can therefore be seen as nothing other than the indoctrination of next generation by the ideology of the state. 

Compulsory school attendance is extended

According to the South African Constitution, everyone has the right to basic education. To enforce this, school attendance in South Africa is compulsory from age 7 to 15 years. Most South African children receive this compulsory education in public schools. Unfortunately, most these schools operate so poorly that, for all practical purposes, many children in South Africa receive no education at all. If the negative effects of bullying, peer pressure, violence, drugs etc. in schools is taken into account, it could be argued that these children mostly receive the opposite of education at public schools.

The Department of Basic Education has announced it is considering extending statutory school-going age to ages 5 to 15 years. This means that many children in South Africa will receive the opposite of education for an even longer period. In doing this the minister undermines the right to education even more, because children will be exposed to the adverse effects of public schools even earlier.

Also, the little freedom which former model-C schools previously have, is further constrained by an initiative of the Gauteng province to pair schools in rich and poor areas together under one governing body, with one bank account.

Monitoring of private schools increased

The state is hostile to private education, as it is regarded as a vote of no confidence in public education. Although the Constitution gives citizens the right to independent schools, the government uses a constitutional provision that private schools must be registered as a tool to regulate private schools in a manner it will soon be affordable only for rich people. (Where the ministers can send their children)

The state places an enormous administrative burden on private schools to register and remain registered. This year the state increased that burden even more by the adoption of a policy that private schools must be monitored by Umalusi. According to a report, the costs of assessment for a school of about 600 pupils will rise from about R7000 per year to R70 000 per year. In addition to these costs private schools are required to do a lot of administration in preparation for Umalusi inspections. Some schools will have to appoint extra staff for this additional administration. 

The strategy of the state to limit private schools by over-regulation is already bearing fruit, as the Department of Basic Education reports that there has not been significant growth in this sector.

National curriculum is extended to birth 

The Department of Education announced that the national curriculum framework will be extended to prescribe the knowledge, skills and attitudes children should learn from birth to age 4. The preschool curriculum consists of six learning areas, namely wellbeing (such as the enjoyment of constitutional rights, healthy food and good health), identity and sense of belonging, communication, discovery of mathematics, creativity and knowledge & understanding of the world. 

This curriculum will be used to monitor registered day care centres and nursery schools more intensively. As from September it will be tested in 100 centres, thereafter it will be made available to all registered day care centres. If all day care centres are to register and are to be monitored to follow this curriculum, it would mean that the government has complete control over the content of what children learn from birth to Gr. 12.

The way forward

The state is working to transform education into a system where children from birth to 15 years only learn a few skills to be productive citizens, but are mainly conditioned in the ideology of the state. No teachers' union, school association, church community, shadow minister or political party are doing anything significant to stop this transformation. Parents who want the freedom to choose education that is in the best interest of their children, are on their own.

For parents with an average income, home schooling is about the only form of education where parents still have a say. From the draft policy which was released by the Western Cape Department of Education, and from the planned policy of the National Department of Education which was leaked earlier this year, it is clear that the intention of the state is to transform home education into an alternative channel through which public education be give under complete control of the Department of Education.

Should home educating parents allow the planned transformation to be introduced, as parents whose children attend public schools and private schools did, then home education will soon only constitute state education at home. Leendert van Oostrum puts it as follows: "With the current process of reviewing home education policy, law and regulations, Home schooling in South Africa is on the threshold of its most serious crisis in twenty years. Homeschoolers who cherish the education of their children will need to make their voices heard in no uncertain terms over the next year or so."

Home Educators can stop this transformation only if they stay informed and stand together in unity.

Stay informed with independent information as follows: 

  • Join the website of the Association for Home schooling
  • "Like" the Facebook Page of the Association for Homeschooling
  • Follow the Society on Twitter with the name @sahomeschoolers
  • Download the "sahomeschoolers" App on your phone (available on Apple App Store and Android Google Play)

Join home schooling organizations and support their campaigns

  • Join the provincial and/or national Associations to Homeschooling to represent parents' interests.
  • Join the Pestalozzi Trust to protect you against unlawful interference in home education.

 

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Comments 9

Bouwe van der Eems on Wednesday, 22 April 2015 15:51

Parents are also losing the freedom to choose the school where they want to send their children. The article below was published in 22 April of the electronic newsletter "DitsemBlits".

-----------------------------------------
REGISTREER KINDERS BETYDS VIR 2016

Groot kommer heers nadat dit aan die lig gekom het dat die Gautengse Dept van Onderwys die registrasieproses en -tydperk in skole gedurig verander en verkort en verklaar dat ouers hulle kinders elektronies moet registreer. Daar word gemeen dat elektroniese aansoeke om skooltoelating tot gevolg sal hê dat die Gauteng Dept. van Onderwys self beheer oor die plasing van leerders kan uitoefen, in plaas van die ouers en skole. Dit is egter strydig met die Skolewet, wat bepaal dat skoolbeheerliggame besluite neem rakende skole se toelatingsbeleid. Die elektroniese inskrywingsplatform maak nie voorsiening vir taalvoorkeure nie, wat gevolglik beteken dat die departement kan besluit in watter taal kinders moet skoolgaan. AfriForum en FEDSAS is gekant teen die elektroniese inskrywings en doen ʼn ernstige beroep op ouers om hul kinders so gou as moontlik met die aanvang van die tweede kwartaal by die skole van hulle keuse vir 2016 te registreer. Ouers word selfs aangeraai om hul kinders by meer as een skool te registreer. Registrasievorms kan by skole verkry word en moet teen 24 April 2015 by die skole van keuse ingehandig wees. Navrae: Carien Bloem, AfriForum, by 082 332 5051 of carien@afriforum.co.za.

[b]Parents are also losing the freedom to choose the school[/b] where they want to send their children. The article below was published in 22 April of the electronic newsletter "[i]DitsemBlits[/i]". ----------------------------------------- [b]REGISTREER KINDERS BETYDS VIR 2016[/b] Groot kommer heers nadat dit aan die lig gekom het dat die Gautengse Dept van Onderwys die registrasieproses en -tydperk in skole gedurig verander en verkort en verklaar dat ouers hulle kinders elektronies moet registreer. Daar word gemeen dat elektroniese aansoeke om skooltoelating tot gevolg sal hê dat die [b]Gauteng Dept. van Onderwys self beheer oor die plasing van leerders kan uitoefen, in plaas van die ouers en skole.[/b] Dit is egter strydig met die Skolewet, wat bepaal dat skoolbeheerliggame besluite neem rakende skole se toelatingsbeleid. Die elektroniese inskrywingsplatform maak nie voorsiening vir taalvoorkeure nie, wat gevolglik beteken dat die departement kan besluit in watter taal kinders moet skoolgaan. AfriForum en FEDSAS is gekant teen die elektroniese inskrywings en doen ʼn ernstige beroep op ouers om hul kinders so gou as moontlik met die aanvang van die tweede kwartaal by die skole van hulle keuse vir 2016 te registreer. Ouers word selfs aangeraai om hul kinders by meer as een skool te registreer. Registrasievorms kan by skole verkry word en moet teen 24 April 2015 by die skole van keuse ingehandig wees. Navrae: Carien Bloem, AfriForum, by 082 332 5051 of carien@afriforum.co.za.
Bouwe van der Eems on Wednesday, 17 June 2015 15:11

During Youth Day of 2015, Cosatu requests government to stop the registration of all private schools. http://goo.gl/RNLRPP

During Youth Day of 2015, Cosatu requests government to stop the registration of all private schools. http://goo.gl/RNLRPP
Bouwe van der Eems on Friday, 19 June 2015 05:25

In the past, Cosatu has also criticised the Public Investment Company (PIC) for investing money in private schools, namely Curro Holdings. Read articles at http://goo.gl/nYDNsO and http://goo.gl/XSvnOl

In the past, Cosatu has also criticised the Public Investment Company (PIC) for investing money in private schools, namely Curro Holdings. Read articles at http://goo.gl/nYDNsO and http://goo.gl/XSvnOl
Bouwe van der Eems on Friday, 31 July 2015 11:35

The United Nations is now also promoting government to take more control over private schools. Read article at http://goo.gl/NLCGbf

The United Nations is now also promoting government to take more control over private schools. Read article at http://goo.gl/NLCGbf
Bouwe van der Eems on Monday, 03 August 2015 16:09

The Gauteng Department of Education has decided to reduce choice even more by their decision not purchasing Gr. 6 Mathematics handbooks. http://goo.gl/hB69M8

The Gauteng Department of Education has decided to reduce choice even more by their decision not purchasing Gr. 6 Mathematics handbooks. http://goo.gl/hB69M8
Bouwe van der Eems on Wednesday, 05 August 2015 05:47

Parents that send their children to private schools are under the impression that private schools are independent and less under government control than public schools. It seems however that the opposite is closer to the truth. By law private schools must register with the Department of Education before they are allowed to operate. That license can be revoked at the drop of a hat by the department of education, and if this happens, investors that started up the schools could lose large amounts of money. Since these investors do not like such risks, private schools are likely to follow government instructions to the finest details.

This has been illustrated the last years. A video emerged of children getting out of a bus after a field trip sponsored by a parent. From the video it seemed that children were segregated according to race. An eyewitness report from a parent : http://goo.gl/gECthk Based on unsubstantiated claims the Gauteng Department of Education threatened to revoke the license of the school. Closure of the school was avoided after the holding company of the school agreed to fire the principle of the school an appoint teachers of other races. http://goo.gl/6VS44N

Where the Department of Education can close a private school by merely revoking a license, it is much more difficult to close a public school. Although the law empowers the MEC to close public schools, an attempt of Western Cape government to close 17 schools failed and was overuled by a decision of the court. http://goo.gl/OAAjjj

Given that it much easier for the provincial education department to close a public school than a private school, it seems that private schools are under more government control that public schools.

Parents that send their children to private schools are under the impression that private schools are independent and less under government control than public schools. It seems however that the opposite is closer to the truth. By law private schools must register with the Department of Education before they are allowed to operate. That license can be revoked at the drop of a hat by the department of education, and if this happens, investors that started up the schools could lose large amounts of money. Since these investors do not like such risks, private schools are likely to follow government instructions to the finest details. This has been illustrated the last years. A video emerged of children getting out of a bus after a field trip sponsored by a parent. From the video it seemed that children were segregated according to race. An eyewitness report from a parent : http://goo.gl/gECthk Based on unsubstantiated claims the Gauteng Department of Education threatened to revoke the license of the school. Closure of the school was avoided after the holding company of the school agreed to fire the principle of the school an appoint teachers of other races. http://goo.gl/6VS44N Where the Department of Education can close a private school by merely revoking a license, it is much more difficult to close a public school. Although the law empowers the MEC to close public schools, an attempt of Western Cape government to close 17 schools failed and was overuled by a decision of the court. http://goo.gl/OAAjjj Given that it much easier for the provincial education department to close a public school than a private school, it seems that private schools are under more government control that public schools.
Bouwe van der Eems on Wednesday, 19 August 2015 05:25

There are also reports that the Gauteng Department of Education attempts to close a school is met with resistance. http://goo.gl/j9hwUN

There are also reports that the Gauteng Department of Education attempts to close a school is met with resistance. http://goo.gl/j9hwUN
Bouwe van der Eems on Wednesday, 19 August 2015 09:36

It is understandable that an organisation such as Curro will do anything to stop government to revoke licenses for it's schools, because the enormous investments that are at stake. Some people view the share price of Curro to be overvalued significantly. If ministers excercise their power to revoke licenses, billions of rands of value can be lost. http://goo.gl/zjWrNl

It is understandable that an organisation such as Curro will do anything to stop government to revoke licenses for it's schools, because the enormous investments that are at stake. Some people view the share price of Curro to be overvalued significantly. If ministers excercise their power to revoke licenses, billions of rands of value can be lost. http://goo.gl/zjWrNl
Bouwe van der Eems on Friday, 09 October 2015 10:37

ANC Women’s League secretary-general Moego Matuba on 8 October 2015 said there was a need to regulate private schools in terms of policy and syllabus. http://goo.gl/bxULH3

ANC Women’s League secretary-general Moego Matuba on 8 October 2015 said there was a need to regulate private schools in terms of policy and syllabus. http://goo.gl/bxULH3
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